Responsible Investment

Text and photos by Kalika Bro-Jørgensen
A group of women in remote Lay Pone Kyauk village, Rakhine State, established their own Village Savings and Loans Association (VSLA) in September 2014. They had no previous experience with such matters when they heard of the concept from Oxfam partner Better Life Organisation during the first phase...
Text and photos by Kalika Bro-Jørgensen
“We need to know which villages are currently being measured, even the very remote ones. We must reach out to collaborate and support each other. One voice is not enough, many people need to talk about this, participation is very important. I have to build self confidence first, but then I...
ၤFishermen in Kyauk Phyu/ Photo by: Kaung Htet
Special Economic Zones (SEZs) are clearly demarcated geographic areas where different legal and regulatory regimes relating to business and trading activities apply. Originally established as a way of circumventing trade restrictions, SEZs are usually intended to create an environment that will...
Agriculture plays a crucial role in the economy of Myanmar and is central to the lives of most of its population, 66 percent of whom live in rural areas. According to the previous government‟s Ministry of Agriculture and Irrigation (MOAI), in 2013–14 agriculture contributed 23 percent of the...
Women workers from the villages where special economic zone will take place, are going for work in Kyauk Phyu Township, Rakhine State. Photo by: Soe Win Nyein/ Oxfam
Author: Yee Mon Oo, Communications and Media Coordinator, Oxfam in Myanmar Villagers in Thit Pote Taung are very concerned about the lack of transparency of investor and Government actions. They say they are living with uncertainty, because it is difficult to access information on the SEZ...
Women garment workers in Hlaing Thar Yar Industrial Zone, going to the work, Photo by: Kaung Htet/Oxfam
This report presents the findings of research carried out by Oxfam in June and July 2015 on the wages and conditions of garment workers in Myanmar. Despite working six days a week and doing an average of 10.5 hours overtime each week, garment workers are not earning enough to adequately support...
Women Farmers in Myanmar Dryzone, Photo by: Hein Latt Aung/ Oxfam
Myanmar is undergoing intense and rapid changes. Policies formulated today will determine the future path of political and economic development. Modernization of the country‟s agricultural sector is, rightly, a priority. However, mechanization and large-scale agricultural investment is not the only...
Women workers in garment factory in Hlaing Thar Yar Industrial Zone, are going to their works. This is where Oxfam conducted research for Made in Myanmar report. Photo by: Kaung Htet/ Oxfam
Myanmar garment workers are living in poverty and forced to borrow money to buy food, despite working up to 11 hours a day, six days a week, according to an Oxfam report released today. Oxfam’s briefing paper, ‘Made in Myanmar: Entrenched Poverty or decent jobs for Garment Workers?...
A farmer in Dryzone where Oxfam implemented livelihoods project funded by LIFT. Photo by: Hein Latt Aung/ Oxfam
The Government of Myanmar must take action to ensure people employed in rural agriculture – over 70% of Myanmar’s population – will benefit from the country’s soaring growth prospects. New research from Oxfam, Delivering Prosperity in Myanmar’s Dry Zone shows that...
Land and water rights are central to the lives of people in Myanmar. For many people land is a critical asset yet people in Myanmar have little access to land rights. Oxfam is working with local and national actors to help protect communities' land and water rights.

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